This is my blog created to analyze society. It is not here to criticize anyone, it is just here to question the norm.

Over It—Eve Ensler

I am over rape.

I am over rape culture, rape mentality, rape pages on Facebook.

I am over the thousands of people who signed those pages with their real names without shame.

I am over people demanding their right to rape pages, and calling it freedom of speech or justifying it as a joke.

I am over people not understanding that rape is not a joke and I am over being told I don’t have a sense of humor, and women don’t have a sense of humor, when most women I know (and I know a lot) are really fucking funny. We just don’t think that uninvited penises up our anus, or our vagina is a laugh riot.

I am over how long it seems to take anyone to ever respond to rape.

I am over Facebook taking weeks to take down rape pages.

I am over the hundreds of thousands of women in Congo still waiting for the rapes to end and the rapists to be held accountable.

I am over the thousands of women in Bosnia, Burma, Pakistan, South Africa, Guatemala, Sierra Leone, Haiti, Afghanistan, Libya, you name a place, still waiting for justice.

I am over rape happening in broad daylight.

I am over the 207 clinics in Ecuador supported by the government that are capturing, raping, and torturing lesbians to make them straight.

I am over one in three women in the U.S military (Happy Veterans Day!) getting raped by their so-called “comrades.”

I am over the forces that deny women who have been raped the right to have an abortion.

I am over the fact that after four women came forward with allegations that Herman Cain groped them and grabbed them and humiliated them, he is still running for the President of the United States.

And I’m over CNBC debate host Maria Bartiromo getting booed when she asked him about it. She was booed, not Herman Cain.

Which reminds me, I am so over the students at Penn State who protested the justice system instead of the alleged rapist pedophile of at least 8 boys, or his boss Joe Paterno, who did nothing to protect those children after knowing what was happening to them.

I am over rape victims becoming re-raped when they go public.

I am over starving Somalian women being raped at the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, and I am over women getting raped at Occupy Wall Street and being quiet about it because they were protecting a movement which is fighting to end the pillaging and raping of the economy and the earth, as if the rape of their bodies was something separate.

I am over women still being silent about rape, because they are made to believe it’s their fault or they did something to make it happen.

I am over violence against women not being a #1 international priority when one out of three women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime — the destruction and muting and undermining of women is the destruction of life itself.

No women, no future, duh.

I am over this rape culture where the privileged with political and physical and economic might, take what and who they want, when they want it, as much as they want, any time they want it.

I am over the endless resurrection of the careers of rapists and sexual exploiters — film directors, world leaders, corporate executives, movie stars, athletes — while the lives of the women they violated are permanently destroyed, often forcing them to live in social and emotional exile.

I am over the passivity of good men. Where the hell are you?

You live with us, make love with us, father us, befriend us, brother us, get nurtured and mothered and eternally supported by us, so why aren’t you standing with us? Why aren’t you driven to the point of madness and action by the rape and humiliation of us?

I am over years and years of being over rape.

And thinking about rape every day of my life since I was 5-years-old.

And getting sick from rape, and depressed from rape, and enraged by rape.

And reading my insanely crowded inbox of rape horror stories every hour of every single day.

I am over being polite about rape. It’s been too long now, we have been too understanding.

We need to OCCUPYRAPE in every school, park, radio, TV station, household, office, factory, refugee camp, military base, back room, night club, alleyway, courtroom, UN office. We need people to truly try and imagine — once and for all — what it feels like to have your body invaded, your mind splintered, your soul shattered. We need to let our rage and our compassion connect us so we can change the paradigm of global rape.

There are approximately one billion women on the planet who have been violated.

ONE BILLION WOMEN.

The time is now. Prepare for the escalation.

Today it begins, moving toward February 14, 2013, when one billion women will rise to end rape.

Because we are over it.

 
1 year ago
1 note
If Mitt Romney is elected, he will be the fourth Republican president in the Reagan regime. That regime is no longer in its glory days. Demographic shifts have weakened the Republican electoral coalition, while Republican politicians have grown increasingly radical and ideological. At best, Romney will be an affiliated president attempting to revive the Republican brand after it has been badly tarnished by George W. Bush; at worst, he will be a disjunctive president, unable to keep his party’s factions together, and presiding over the end of the Reagan coalition. Throughout his career, Romney has presented himself as a pragmatic, data-driven, hands-on problem-solver. In this respect he resembles our two last disjunctive presidents, Herbert Hoover and Jimmy Carter. Yet in order to secure his party’s nomination, Romney has had to twist his positions to conform to the most radical demands of the Republican base.
crisisgroup:

Southern Africa: SADC Failures Allowing Zim Crisis to Unfold | All Africa 
By Alex Bell
The Southern African Development Community (SADC) is facing calls to urgently rectify its failures, which have allowed the crisis in Zimbabwe and other parts of the region to unfold.
A new report by the International Crisis Group has described SADC’s many weaknesses, which have “prevented the leadership bloc from effectively dealing with threats to peace and security in the region.”
FULL ARTICLE (All Africa)
Photo: Lokal_Profil/Wikimedia Commons

crisisgroup:

Southern Africa: SADC Failures Allowing Zim Crisis to Unfold | All Africa 

By Alex Bell

The Southern African Development Community (SADC) is facing calls to urgently rectify its failures, which have allowed the crisis in Zimbabwe and other parts of the region to unfold.

A new report by the International Crisis Group has described SADC’s many weaknesses, which have “prevented the leadership bloc from effectively dealing with threats to peace and security in the region.”

FULL ARTICLE (All Africa)

Photo: Lokal_Profil/Wikimedia Commons

1 year ago
6 notes
White privilege is when you can get pregnant at seventeen like Bristol Palin and everyone is quick to insist that your life and that of your family is a personal matter, and that no one has a right to judge you or your parents, because “every family has challenges,” even as black and Latino families with similar “challenges” are regularly typified as irresponsible, pathological and arbiters of social decay.

http://thehill.com/blogs/healthwatch/politics-elections/264187-obama-no-doubt-roe-v-wade-could-be-overturned-if-romney-wins

If anyone has been listening to the political news recently, you might be aware that if Romney does in fact win that this could easily mean the end to abortions under any circumstance. This means completely removing Roe v. Wade and removing Planned Parenthood to name a few outcomes. Our generation and our mothers’ generations never had to deal with life without these things. It was even commented by the Republican party that it was “the will of God” if a woman was impregnated when she was raped therefore she must keep her baby. Think of the torture. Think of the torture of looking into that child’s face one day and seeing the face of the man who once committed such a horrible act on this woman! How is it that MEN in the office think they can hold the power of WOMEN’S sexual livelihood?! It is absolutely ridiculous. It’s ok to them until their own daughter is raped and must keep her child. It’s ok for them because let’s face it, the wealthier upper class, white men can just fly these women out of the country for abortions so they’re safe right? What about the lower class African american and latina women? What’re they going to do? Women will find a way to have an abortion if that’s what they want even if it risks shoving a wire up their vaginas, risking infection, or risking their own lives. Also, by removing Planned Parenthood it removes free birth control for women who cannot afford it. Who cares though right? Who cares if these men can still buy Viagra to “get it up” while women have nothing? This is complete and utter bullshit. It is also justified under a religious aspect, but guess what OUR CONSTITUTION EXPLICITLY CLAIMS A SEPARATION BETWEEN CHURCH AND STATE. Wouldn’t this be constitutionally wrong?! You cannot impose your own religious beliefs on the rest of your FREE country. No. Take a step back america and check yourself.

1 year ago
1 note

Teaching is in fact a profession and should be given the credit for what it is. It should be considered one of the highest professions there is due to the fact that it is the system which holds the future in the palms of its hands. Without this profession chaos would certainly ensue. 

The autonomy of work is a tiered system starting with teachers aids to teachers to principal and vice principal then up to the board all controlled by the state. Consider the teacher. While teachers work under a principal, teachers are typically on their own. Principals are rarely in the classroom and do not have direct teaching influence with the students. The teacher holds the power to carry out what is being taught to students and how. Because they have this much power (to know the students, to choose what is being taught to the students and how, to be the mentor) teachers should definitely be considered a profession.
The structure of compensation should also enforce the need to be called a profession. According to the U.S. Department of Education, the structure of compensation includes salary, extra pay, benefits (ex: health), and pension. Because all of these are directly given to each individual teacher and priced according to how well the teacher is doing independently in the system this should certainly be a profession. Think of doctors who all work in the same office practicing the same job. Most likely, these doctors do not receive the same salaries and/or benefits, pensions, or extra pay. This is the same with teachers.
The ethics and societal views are critical when it comes to teaching as a profession. Teaching is held to some of the highest standards and expectations yet the pay does not show. The ethics exercised within the classroom is what bases societal views off of teaching. For example, when hearing about a teacher sexually assaulting a student (bad ethics) then it being broadcasted on national television the society will see it as a disgrace to the system (aka a bad view). BUT if a teacher wins an award for putting in extra time for that one struggling student, or making a point to not hug children in fear of being accused of something (good ethics) they will be rewarded with having the community trust them with their children (good view—yay!). Since teachers must go out of their ways to exaggerate their good morals and sometimes go even farther than usual to avoid unnecessary repercussions they should be given the privilege of calling teaching a profession.
It is apparent that teaching deserves a title higher than what it is given. It holds the trust of its community to treat their children respectfully and dedicates their lives to giving students the best education to grow as moral, intelligent people who will one day be running the world! By lessening the value of teaching, there is also lesser of a value placed onto education as a whole. Teachers will not be encouraged to give their all if they do not have the support needed to accomplish the goal of a top-notch quality education and students will most likely not get all the resources they need to succeed. 
1 year ago
0 notes
BREAKING: A Pennsylvania bill that would have limited welfare benefits for low-income mothers—unless they could prove their newborns were a result of rape—has been withdrawn by the lawmakers who introduced it after a wave of criticism following its announcement.

“The [bill’s] language was not at all what I requested,” said Republican Representative RoseMarie Swanger in a voicemail message to The Daily Beast. “After all the concerned contacts I got, I’m pulling that and working on something better next year.”

House Bill 2718 would have cut assistance to low-income families supplied by the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Program, but created an exemption for rape victims and children conceived during rape. The bill would have required women to prove they had reported their rapes to authorities. Critics said this was unrealistic—slightly more than half of all rapes go unreported—but also assumes only rapes that are reported to authorities count as rape.

Swanger told The Daily Beast she decided to yank the bill after a flood of calls from reporters. She had hoped to model the Pennsylvania Bill after a successful law passed in New Jersey that limited welfare funds to families as they had more children.

(via newsweek)

1 year ago
55 notes
kaelestia:

Much improved, do it for you, and not for anyone else. Feel better, don’t look better.

kaelestia:

Much improved, do it for you, and not for anyone else. Feel better, don’t look better.

2 years ago
18 notes